Baron Conyers

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Baron Conyers is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created on 17 October 1509 for William Conyers, the son-in-law of William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent. The abeyance after the death of the 3rd baron was terminated for the 7th Baron Darcy de Knayth, these baronies were held together until the abeyance of 1888, after which the abeyance of these two baronies were separately terminated. Since 1509, the Barons Conyers had held a part of the “right” to the barony Fauconberg, i.e. the part for which the abeyance was terminated in 1903; and since the termination of the abeyance of the barony Fauconberg, the two baronies, Conyers and Fauconberg, had been held together; from 1948 they were abeyant between the two daughters of the 5th Earl of Yarborough. On the death of the younger daughter in 2012[1] the abeyance terminated automatically in favour of her elder sister, the 15th holder of the title.[2] Since the death of the latter in 2013, the title is in abeyance once more.[3]
The baronies Conyers and Darcy de Knayth originated the courtesy title of the eldest son of the Earl of Holderness as Lord Darcy and Conyers.
Barons Conyers (1509)[edit]

William Conyers, 1st Baron Conyers (d. 1524)
Christopher Conyers, 2nd Baron Conyers (d. 1538)
John Conyers, 3rd Baron Conyers (d. 1557) (abeyant 1557)
Conyers Darcy, 7th Baron Darcy de Knayth and 4th Baron Conyers (1570–1654) (abeyance terminated c. 1641/44 in favour of the 3rd Baron’s grandson)
Conyers Darcy, 1st Earl of Holderness, 8th Baron Darcy de Knayth and 5th Baron Conyers (d. 1689)
Conyers Darcy, 2nd Earl of Holderness, 9th Baron Darcy de Knayth and 6th Baron Conyers (c. 1620–1692)
Robert Darcy, 3rd Earl of Holderness, 10th Baron Darcy de Knayth and 7th Baron Conyers (1681–1722)
Robert Darcy, 4th Earl of Holderness, 11th Baron Darcy de Knayth and 8th Baron Conyers (1718–1778)
Amelia Osborne, 12th Baroness Darcy de Knayth and 9th Baroness Conyers (1754–1784)
George William Frederick Osborne, 6th Duke of Leeds, 13th Baron Darcy de Knayth and 10th Baron Conyers (1775–1838)
Francis Godolphin Darcy-Osborne, 7th Duke of Leeds, 14th Baron Darcy de Knayth and 11th Baron Conyers (1798–1859)
Sackville George Lane-Fox, 15th Baron Darcy de Knayth and 12th
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Battle of Chios

Battle of Chios can refer to one of the following battles fought on or near the Greek island of Chios:

Battle of Chios (201 BC), sea battle between Macedonia and an alliance headed by Rhodes and Pergamum
Battle of Chios (1319), sea battle between the Knights Hospitaller and Turkish corsairs
Battle of Chios (1822), suppression of Greek revolt and massacre of the island’s population by Ottoman forces
Battle of Chios (1912), conquest of the island by Greece

See also[edit]

Battle of Chesma
Battle of Embata
Battle of the Oinousses Islands

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Battle of Chios.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Health Education England

Health Education England (HEE) is an executive non-departmental public body of the Department of Health. Their function is to provide national leadership and coordination for the education and training within the health and public health workforce within England. It has been operational since June 2012.

Contents

1 Functions
2 History
3 Plans
4 Junior Doctors Contract
5 References
6 External links

Functions[edit]
Key functions of HEE include:[1]

providing leadership for the new education and training system.
ensuring that the workforce has the right skills, behaviours and training, and is available in the right numbers, to support the delivery of excellent healthcare and drive improvements
supporting healthcare providers and clinicians to take greater responsibility for planning and commissioning education and training through the development of Local Education and Training Boards (LETBs), which are statutory committees of HEE
ensuring that the shape and skills of the health and public health workforce evolve with demographic and technological change

History[edit]
HEE was one of the new bodies set out in the NHS reforms of April 2012.[2] Originally established as a Special Health Authority on 28 June 2012, it became a non-departmental public body (NDPB) on 1 April 2015 under the provisions of the Care Act 2014.[1]
Plans[edit]
Its third national workforce plan, published in December 2015, provides for an increase of nearly 15% in nurses and doctors trained by 2020. This is planned to lead to an increase of 21,133 qualified adult nurses, 6039 hospital consultants and 5381 General Practitioners after allowing for retirement and staff turnover. [3]
Junior Doctors Contract[edit]
In February 2016, the chief executive of HEE Ian Cumming sent a letter to all the chief executives of NHS Foundation trusts indicating that the organisation could cut funding for training posts in any trust which refused to impose the new juniors doctor contract.[4] In January 2017, emails seen by the newspaper The Independent showed that HEE sent drafts of the letter to the Department of Health and that the Secretary of State for Health Jeremy Hunt was aware of the letter prior to publication.[5]
References[edit]

^ a b “About Health Education England”. Health Education England. Retrieved 13 June 2015. 
^ “Implementation of the Health and Social Care Act”. British Medical Journal. 3 April 2013. Retrieved 18 April 2013. 
^ “Health Education England reveals plan to de

Zhao Tao

For the Chinese male swimmer, see Zhao Tao (swimmer).
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Zhao.

Zhao Tao

Background information

Chinese name
赵涛 (simplified)

Pinyin
Zhào Tāo (Mandarin)

Born
(1977-01-28) 28 January 1977 (age 40)
Taiyuan, China

Occupation
Actress,Producer

Years active
1999-Present

Spouse(s)
Jia Zhangke (2012-Present)

Zhao Tao (born 28 January 1977) is a Chinese actress. She works in China and occasionally Europe, and has appeared in 10 films and several shorts since starting her career in 1999. She is best known for her collaborations with her husband, director Jia Zhangke, including Platform (2000) and Still Life (2006). With Shun Li and the Poet (2011), she became the first Asian actress to win a prize at David di Donatello. She received a Golden Horse Award nomination for Mountains May Depart (2015).

Contents

1 Biography
2 Personal life
3 Complete Filmography
4 References
5 External links

Biography[edit]
She was born January 28, 1977, in Taiyuan, Shanxi, which is also the hometown of the heroine in Still Life. As a child, she studied classical Chinese dance. In 1996, she enrolled in the folk dance department at Beijing Dance Academy. After graduation, she became a dance teacher in Taiyuan Normal College, where she was spotted by Jia during casting for Platform.[1] Since then they work frequently together.
In 2011 she starred in the Italian film Shun Li and the Poet by Andrea Segre, which screened in the Venice Days section of the 68th Venice International Film Festival.[2] Zhao won the David di Donatello Award, the Italian Oscar, for Best Actress for her bilingual role.

Zhao Tao at 2016 Canne Film Festival

Personal life[edit]
On January 7, 2012 she married director Jia Zhangke.
Complete Filmography[edit]

Year
English Title
Chinese Title
Role
Notes

2000
Platform
站台
Yin Ruijuan
Ensemble

2002
Unknown Pleasures
任逍遥
Qiao Qiao
Lead

2004
The World
世界
Tao
Lead

2006
Still Life
三峡好人
Shen Hong
Lead

2007
Our Ten Years
我们的十年

Lead

2008
24 City
二十四城记
Su Na
Ensemble

2008
Dada’s Dance
达达

Ensemble

2008
Cry Me a River
河上的愛情
Zhou Qi
Lead

2009
Remembrance
念石

Lead

2010
Ten Thousand Waves

Blue Goddess
Ensemble

2011
Shun Li and the Poet
我是丽
Shun Li
Lead

2013
A Touch of Sin
天注定
Xiao Yu
Ensemble

2015
Mountains May Depart
山河故人
Shen Tao
Lead

References[edit]

^ “Constant Muse: Jia Zhangke’s leading l
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Vaale

Vaale

Coat of arms

Vaale

Location of Vaale within Steinburg district 

Coordinates: 54°0′0″N 9°22′59″E / 54.00000°N 9.38306°E / 54.00000; 9.38306Coordinates: 54°0′0″N 9°22′59″E / 54.00000°N 9.38306°E / 54.00000; 9.38306

Country
Germany

State
Schleswig-Holstein

District
Steinburg

Municipal assoc.
Schenefeld

Government

 • Mayor
Thomas Hencke

Area

 • Total
14.91 km2 (5.76 sq mi)

Population (2015-12-31)[1]

 • Total
1,206

 • Density
81/km2 (210/sq mi)

Time zone
CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)

Postal codes
25594

Dialling codes
04827

Vehicle registration
IZ

Website
www.amt-schenefeld.de

Vaale is a municipality in the district of Steinburg, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.

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Towns and municipalities in Steinburg

Aasbüttel
Aebtissinwisch
Agethorst
Altenmoor
Auufer
Bahrenfleth
Beidenfleth
Bekdorf
Bekmünde
Besdorf
Blomesche Wildnis
Bokelrehm
Bokhorst
Borsfleth
Breitenberg
Breitenburg
Brokdorf
Brokstedt
Büttel
Christinenthal
Dägeling
Dammfleth
Drage
Ecklak
Elskop
Engelbrechtsche Wildnis
Fitzbek
Glückstadt
Grevenkop
Gribbohm
Hadenfeld
Heiligenstedten
Heiligenstedtenerkamp
Hennstedt
Herzhorn
Hingstheide
Hodorf
Hohenaspe
Hohenfelde
Hohenlockstedt
Holstenniendorf
Horst
Huje
Itzehoe
Kaaks
Kaisborstel
Kellinghusen
Kiebitzreihe
Kleve
Kollmar
Kollmoor
Krempdorf
Krempe
Kremperheide
Krempermoor
Kronsmoor
Krummendiek
Kudensee
Lägerdorf
Landrecht
Landscheide
Lockstedt
Lohbarbek
Looft
Mehlbek
Moordiek
Moorhusen
Mühlenbarbek
Münsterdorf
Neuenbrook
Neuendorf bei Elmshorn
Neuendorf-Sachsenbande
Nienbüttel
Nortorf
Nutteln
Oelixdorf
Oeschebüttel
Oldenborstel
Oldendorf
Ottenbüttel
Peissen
Pöschendorf
Poyenberg
Puls
Quarnstedt
Rade
Reher
Rethwisch
Rosdorf
Sankt Margarethen
Sarlhusen
Schenefeld
Schlotfeld
Siezbüttel
Silzen
Sommerland
Stördorf
Störkathen
Süderau
Vaale
Vaalermoor
Wacken
Warringholz
Westermoor
Wewelsfleth
Wiedenborstel
Willenscharen
Wilster
Winseldorf
Wittenbergen
Wrist
Wulfsmoor

References[edit]

^ “Statistikamt Nord – Bevölkerung der Gemeinden in Schleswig-Holstein 4. Quartal 2015] (XLS-file)”. Statistisches Amt für Hamburg und Schleswig-Holstein (in German). 

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 139037039
GND: 2045981-6

This Steinburg location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Moniliella

Moniliella

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Fungi

Division:
Basidiomycota

Subdivision:
Ustilaginomycotina

Class:
incertae sedis[1]

Order:
incertae sedis

Family:
Moniliellaceae

Genus:
Moniliella
Stolk & Dakin (1966)

Type species

Moniliella acetoabutans
Stolk & Dakin

Synonyms

Trichosporonoides Haskins & J.F.T. Spencer (1967)

Moniliella is a genus of fungi in the subdivision Ustilaginomycotina. Some species of Moniliella can cause disease in humans[2] and in cats.[3] The genus includes the black, yeast-like fungi in the Basidiomycota, although the black, yeast-like fungi also include some species from the Ascomycota.[4]
Species[edit]
List of species:[5]

M. acetoabutans
M. fonsecae[6]
M. madida (formerly in Trichosporonoides)[6]
M. megachiliensis (formerly in Trichosporonoides)[6]
M. mellis
M. nigrescens (formerly in Trichosporonoides)[6]
M. oedocephalis (formerly in Trichosporonoides)[6]
M. pollinis
M. spathulata (formerly in Trichosporonoides)[6]
M. suaveolens[3]
M. tomentosa, an osmophile[7]

References[edit]

^ Ookura T, Kasumi T (2008), “Phylogenetic analysis of the yeast Trichosporonoides megachiliensis”, Rep. Nat. Food Res. Inst., 72: 73–76 
^ Guarro, J; Genéj; Stchigel, Am (1999), “Developments in Fungal Taxonomy”, Clinical Microbiology Reviews, 12 (3): 454–500, ISSN 0893-8512, PMC 100249, PMID 10398676 
^ a b McKenzie RA, Connole MD, McGinnis MR, Lepelaar R (1984), “Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by Moniliella suaveolens in two cats”, Veterinary Pathology, 21 (6): 582–586, PMID 6542716 
^ Yurlova NA, de Hoog GS, Fedorova LG (2008), “The influence of ortho- and para-diphenoloxidase substrates on pigment formation in black yeast-like fungi”, Studies in Mycology, 61: 39–49, doi:10.3114/sim.2008.61.03, PMC 2610312, PMID 19287525 
^ Moniliella “Index Fungorum – Search Page”. Retrieved 2009-07-22. 
^ a b c d e f Rosa CA, Jindamorakot S, Limtong S, Nakase T, Lachance MA, Fidalgo-Jiménez A, Daniel HM, Pagnocca FC, Inácio J, Morais PB (February 2009), “Synonymy of the yeast genera Moniliella and Trichosporonoides and proposal of Moniliella fonsecae sp. nov. and five new species combinations”, Int J Syst Evol Microbiol., 59 (Pt 2): 425–429, doi:10.1099/ijs.0.65117-0, PMID 19196790 
^ Hanssens L, Verachtert H (1976), “Types of respiratory activity in Moniliella tomentosa during growth under different conditions”, Applied and Enviro
인천오피

Roman Catholic Diocese of Cairns

Diocese of Cairns
Dioecesis Cairnensis

Location

Country
Australia

Territory
Far North region of Queensland

Ecclesiastical province
Brisbane

Metropolitan
Brisbane

Coordinates
16°55′00″S 145°46′21″E / 16.91667°S 145.77250°E / -16.91667; 145.77250

Statistics

Area
377,000 km2 (146,000 sq mi)

Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2006)
235,396
59,912 ( 25.5%%)

Parishes
24

Information

Denomination
Roman Catholic

Rite
Latin Rite

Established
1877 as Vicariate Apostolic of Queensland;
10 May 1887 as Vicariate Apostolic of Cooktown;
8 July 1941 as Diocese of Cairns

Cathedral
St Monica’s Cathedral, Cairns

Current leadership

Pope
Francis

Bishop
James Foley

Website

Roman Catholic Diocese of Cairns

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Cairns is a Latin Rite suffragan diocese of the Archdiocese of Brisbane, erected initially as a vicariate apostolic in 1877 and elevated to a diocese in 1941, covering the far north region of Queensland, Australia.
St Monica’s Cathedral is the seat of the Catholic Bishop of Cairns, currently James Foley.

Contents

1 History
2 Ordinaries
3 Parishes
4 See also
5 References
6 External links

History[edit]
Following the discovery of gold near Cooktown in 1872 and the establishment and growth of sugar production during the 1870s, the Bishop of Brisbane, James Quinn, visited Cooktown in 1874. The first church was opened a year later.[1] Quinn had earlier been petitioning the Roman Curia to create a vicariate in north Queensland to minister to Catholics in the region and to evangelise the Aborigines, with the Vicariate Apostolic of Queensland officially created in 1877. An initial attempt to install Italian priests from the Pontifical Seminary of the Apostles Saints Peter and Paul of Rome was a failure; mainly due to cultural and language issues with both the indigenous and predominately Irish lay population.[1] Quinn, from Ireland, appointed one of his fellow countryman, John Cani as the first Pro-Vicar who served up until Quinn’s death in 1882 when Cani returned to Brisbane before being appointed as the first Bishop of Rockhampton. A short term under Monsignor Paul Fortini followed, with clashes between laity and priests before the parish of Herberton was placed interdict in 1883; meaning that sacraments could not be celebrated. Fortini was recalled to Rome.[1]
A stable period followed under the pastoral care of the Augustinians. The number of paris
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List of mayors of Windhoek

The city of Windhoek, capital of Namibia, was officially founded on 18 October 1890 by Curt von François, an Imperial German colonial official in the Schutztruppe,[1] to serve as capital of German South-West Africa. Since then, the city had 49 different mayors, the first of them starting to serve in 1909.[2]

Contents

1 List of mayors

1.1 German colonial administration (1894–1915)
1.2 South African mandate (1920–66)
1.3 South African occupation (1966–89)
1.4 Independent Namibia (1990–present)

2 References

2.1 Notes
2.2 Literature
2.3 External links

List of mayors[edit]
This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.
German colonial administration (1894–1915)[edit]

1909–10: Dr Fritsche, first mayor of Windhoek[2]
1910–11: Gustav Voigts[2]
1911–16: Peter Müller, born 1873, member of the Schutztruppe, later businessman[3]

South African mandate (1920–66)[edit]

19??–18: Dr Kohler[4]
1920–22: Peter Müller[3]
1927–28: Joseph Wood, born 17 February 1876 in Birmingham, England, a Wesleyan Church minister.[5]
1929–38:John Meinert, born 9 December 1886 in Hamburg, Germany. Businessman and founder of John Meinert Printing Ltd.[2][3]
19??–??: Edgar Sander, born 4 March 1895 in Leipzig, Germany, entered Namibia in 1923. Sander farmed with Karakul skins and was a member of the Legislative Assembly of South-West Africa.[6]
19??–??: Abraham Bernard May, medical doctor and district surgeon[3]
1941–46: Marie Elizabeth May Bell,[7] first female mayor of Windhoek[2]
1950s: Simon Frank, born 11 October 1913 in Robertson, South Africa. Advocate Frank was mayor of Newcastle in KwaZulu-Natal before taking the post in Windhoek.[8]
1954–55: Willem Hendrik Immelmann, born 11 February 1904 in Sutherland, South Africa, was a manager at Windhoek Universal Motors.[9]
1956–57: Hermanus Johannes Steyn, born in 1890 in Ermelo, South Africa. Steyn was an ophthalmologist and the leader of the National Party of South-West Africa.[6]
1957–61: Jaap Snyman (Jacobus van Deventer Snyman), businessman, born 7 February 1919 in Zeerust, South Africa. Snyman was the owner of the car that was set on fire during the Old Location Uprising in December 1959, prompting the police to open fire at the protesters and killing 11 people.[6]
1961–63: Stefanus Johannes Spies, born 26 June 1922 in Oudtshoorn, South Africa. He was a businessman and entered Namibia in 1945.[6]
1963–65: Jack Levinson[2]
1965-?: Sam Davis[10]

South African occupation (
강남오피

Norberto Rivera Carrera

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (August 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

His Eminence
Norberto Rivera Carrera

Cardinal, Archbishop of Mexico
Primate of Mexico

Diocese
Mexico

Appointed
13 June 1995

Predecessor
Ernesto Corripio y Ahumada

Other posts
Cardinal-Priest of S. Francesco d’Assisi a Ripa Grande
Member of Council for the Economy

Orders

Ordination
3 July 1966
by Pope Paul VI

Consecration
21 December 1985
by Antonio López Aviña

Created Cardinal
21 February 1998

Rank
Cardinal-Priest

Personal details

Born
(1942-06-04) 4 June 1942 (age 74)
La Purísima, Durango, Mexico

Nationality
Mexican

Denomination
Roman Catholic

Previous post

Roman Catholic Bishop of Tehuacán (1985–1995)

Alma mater
Pontifical Gregorian University

Motto
Lumen Gentium

Coat of arms

Styles of
Norberto Rivera Carrera

Reference style
His Eminence

Spoken style
Your Eminence

Informal style
Cardinal

See
Mexico

Ordination history of Norberto Rivera Carrera

Episcopal consecration

Principal consecrator
Antonio López Aviña (Durango)

Date of consecration
December 21, 1985

Bishops consecrated by Norberto Rivera Carrera as principal consecrator

José de Jesús Martínez Zepeda
April 12, 1997

Marcelino Hernández Rodríguez
February 5, 1998

Felipe Tejeda García
March 4, 2000

José Luis Fletes Santana
March 4, 2000

Guillermo Rodrigo Teodoro Ortiz Mondragón
March 4, 2000

Francisco Clavel Gil
June 27, 2001

Norberto Rivera Carrera (born June 4, 1942) is a Mexican Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. He is the Archbishop of Mexico City and the Primate Archbishop of Mexico He was elevated to the cardinalate in 1998.

Contents

1 Early life and ministry
2 Episcopal career and cardinalate
3 Sexual child abuse cover-up accusation
4 References
5 External links

Early life and ministry[edit]
Norberto Rivera Carrera was born in La Purísima, a small town in Tepehuanes Municipality, to Ramón Rivera Cháidez and Soledad Carrera; he has a sister who is a nun. His father immigrated to and worked in the United States in order to support the family. Rivera entered the seminary of Durango in 1955. He later went to Rome
소라넷

Takanabe, Miyazaki

Takanabe
高鍋町

Town

Location of Takanabe in Miyazaki Prefecture

Takanabe

Location in Japan

Coordinates: 32°07′50″N 131°30′37″E / 32.13056°N 131.51028°E / 32.13056; 131.51028Coordinates: 32°07′50″N 131°30′37″E / 32.13056°N 131.51028°E / 32.13056; 131.51028

Country
Japan

Region
Kyushu

Prefecture
Miyazaki Prefecture

District
Koyu

Area

 • Total
43.92 km2 (16.96 sq mi)

Population (2003)

 • Total
22,613

 • Density
510/km2 (1,300/sq mi)

Time zone
Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)

Website
www.town.takanabe.miyazaki.jp

Takanabe (高鍋町, Takanabe-chō?) is a town located in Koyu District, Miyazaki Prefecture, Japan.
In 2003, the town had an estimated population of 22,613 and a density of 514.87 persons per km². The total area is 43.92 km².
External links[edit]

Media related to Takanabe, Miyazaki at Wikimedia Commons
Takanabe official website (Japanese)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 255822746
NDL: 00327419

This Miyazaki Prefecture location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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BJ야동