Rotuma Day

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Rotuma Day

Official name
Rotuma Day

Observed by
Rotumans

Celebrations
welcoming ceremony and feast called ‘mamasa’

Date
May 13

Next time
13 May 2017 (2017-05-13)

Frequency
annual

Rotuma Day is an annual celebration on the island of Rotuma, a Fijian dependency. It falls on May 13, the anniversary of the island’s cession to the United Kingdom in 1881.[1]
As there are more people of Rotuman descent outside Rotuma than on the island, celebrations are held in other centres besides Rotuma, with big events in Suva and Lautoka.[2][3]

Celebrations[edit]
The 2005 events marked the 124th anniversary of the annexation of the island to the United Kingdom.
Speaking at the Suva celebration, Fiji’s High Commissioner to Australia, Major Jioje Konrote, himself a Rotuman Islander, commended Rotumans living outside Rotuma for maintaining their links to their homelands. There are some two thousand people on Rotuma, with a further ten thousand Rotumans in metropolitan Fiji.
Joji Kotobalavu, Chief Executive of the Prime Minister’s office, told Rotumans that their island would always be a special part of Fiji, recognized alongside the fourteen provinces. He commended them for their disproportionate achievements and contributions towards the development of Fiji as a country, while Labour Minister Kenneth Zinck paid tribute to the many Rotumans to have distinguished themselves in the fields of education, medicine, business, and society.
References[edit]

^ Rabulu, Solomone (2016-05-17). “Rotuman community celebrates”. Cook Islands News. Cook Islands News Limited. 
^ “Where has Rotuman culture gone?”. www.hawaii.edu. Retrieved 2015-05-18. 
^ Center, Media (2013-05-07). “Fiji Government Online Portal – GOVERNMENT TEAM TO BE PART OF ROTUMA DAY CELEBRATIONS”. Fiji Government Online Portal – Press Releases. Department of Information. 

External links[edit]

“Rotumans celebrate big day”, Fiji Times, May 11, 2008

M-1941 Field Jacket

A South Florida reenactor wears a modern-day reproduction of the famed field jacket.

Olive Drab Cotton Field Jacket (also known as OD Cotton Field Jacket, Parsons Jacket, M-1938 or M-1941) is a field jacket used by US Army soldiers, most famously during the beginning of World War II. In 1941 it started to be phased in as a replacement for the wool four pocket service coat, but around 1943 it was replaced in turn by an improved M-1943 model. Due to wide adoption, M-1941 is usually recognized as a symbol of the World War II American G.I.. The jacket was made in a lighter shade of olive drab called OD number 3.

Contents

1 The First Field Jacket
2 Jacket Design
3 World War II
4 References
5 External links

The First Field Jacket[edit]
From World War I up until 1940 soldiers in the United States Army wore a wool four pocket service coat as the outer garment of their uniforms, both in garrison and in the field. This followed the general pattern adopted by most major armies of the world, but proved to be rather impractical. At the end of the 1930s, the Army moved to adopt a new outer garment that was intended to be more utilitarian and provide better protection in combat. The army’s first attempts included adding a pleated “bi-swing” back to the service coat, a change adopted with the M-1939 Service Coat.
The first field jacket was based on a civilian jacket suggested by Major General James K. Parsons, for whom it was unofficially named.[1] Unlike the service coat, the material for the jacket was more wind and water resistant. A further reason for adopting a field jacket made of a different material was that there were expected shortages of wool.[2] The jacket could be worn with both winter (OD wool) and summer (khaki chino) uniforms as well as fatigue uniforms. The Olive Drab Cotton Field Jacket was standardized and adopted in June 1940 for use by all members of the US Army for wear with both the winter and summer service uniforms. Jackets of similar design were later also adopted by the navy and Marine Corps.
Note that many individuals have referred to the OD cotton field jacket incorrectly as either the “M-1938” or “M-1941”, “M-41” (hence the title of this article). This designation is, however, false. The Army Quartermaster Corps, who developed clothing, used model numbers sparingly and only used them to differentiate two or more similar types of garments from one another. In 1940, there was only one field jacket, so there was no need to give it

Atlamajalcingo del Monte (municipality)

Atlamajalcingo del Monte

Municipality

Atlamajalcingo del Monte

Location in Mexico

Coordinates: 18°13′N 99°29′W / 18.217°N 99.483°W / 18.217; -99.483Coordinates: 18°13′N 99°29′W / 18.217°N 99.483°W / 18.217; -99.483

Country
 Mexico

State
Guerrero

Municipal seat
Atlamajalcingo del Monte

Area

 • Total
199.4 km2 (77.0 sq mi)

Population (2005)

 • Total
5,143

Atlamajalcingo del Monte is one of the 81 municipalities of Guerrero, in south-western Mexico. The municipal seat lies at Atlamajalcingo del Monte. The municipality covers an area of 199.4 km².
As of 2005, the municipality had a total population of 5,143.[1]
References[edit]

^ “Atlamajalcingo del Monte”. Enciclopedia de los Municipios de México. Instituto Nacional para el Federalismo y el Desarrollo Municipal. Archived from the original on June 17, 2011. Retrieved December 23, 2008. 

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State of Guerrero

Chilpancingo (capital)

Municipalities/
(seats)

Acapulco de Juárez (Acapulco)
Acatepec (Acatepec)
Ajuchitlán del Progreso (Ajuchitlán)
Ahuacuotzingo (Ahuacuotzingo)
Alcozauca de Guerrero (Alcozauca de Guerrero)
Alpoyeca (Alpoyeca)
Apaxtla (Apaxtla de Castrejón)
Arcelia (Arcelia)
Atenango del Río (Atenango del Río)
Atlamajalcingo del Monte (Atlamajalcingo del Monte)
Atlixtac (Atlixtac)
Atoyac de Álvarez (Atoyac de Álvarez)
Ayutla de los Libres (Ayutla de los Libres)
Azoyú (Azoyú)
Benito Juárez (San Jerónimo de Juárez)
Buenavista de Cuéllar (Buenavista de Cuéllar)
Chilapa de Álvarez (Chilapa de Álvarez)
Chilpancingo de los Bravo (Chilpancingo de los Bravo)
Coahuayutla de José María Izazaga (Coahuayutla de Guerrero)
Cochoapa el Grande (Cochoapa el Grande)
Cocula (Cocula)
Copala (Copala)
Copalillo (Copalillo)
Copanatoyac (Copanatoyac)
Coyuca de Benítez (Coyuca de Benítez)
Coyuca de Catalán (Coyuca de Catalán)
Cuajinicuilapa (Cuajinicuilapa)
Cualac (Cualac)
Cuautepec (Cuautepec)
Cuetzala del Progreso (Cuetzala del Progreso)
Cutzamala de Pinzón (Cutzamala de Pinzón)
Eduardo Neri (Zumpango del Río)
Florencio Villarreal (Cruz Grande)
General Canuto A. Neri (Acapetlahuaya)

General Heliodoro Castillo (Tlacotepec)
Huamuxtitlán (Huamuxtitlán)
Huitzuco de los Figueroa (Huitzuco)
Iguala de la Independencia (Iguala de la Independencia)
Igualapa (Igualapa)
Ixcateopan de Cuauhtémoc (Ixcateopan de Cuauhtémoc)
Iliatenco (Iliatenco)
José Jo

Epepeotes fimbriatus

Epepeotes fimbriatus

Epepeotes fimbriatus from Ternate Island. Male and female

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Arthropoda

Class:
Insecta

Order:
Coleoptera

Family:
Cerambycidae

Genus:
Epepeotes

Species:
E. fimbriatus

Binomial name

Epepeotes fimbriatus
Olivier, 1792

Epepeotes fimbriatus is a species of flat-faced longhorns beetle belonging to the family Cerambycidae, subfamily Lamiinae.
Description[edit]
Epepeotes fimbriatus reaches about 25 millimetres (0.98 in) in length.
Distribution[edit]
This species can be found in Indonesia (Moluccas).
References[edit]

Biolib
Global Names

This Lamiini article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Tony Peake

Tony Peake (born 1951) is a novelist, short story writer and biographer.

Contents

1 Biography

1.1 Early life
1.2 Career

2 Works

2.1 Non Fiction
2.2 Short stories

3 External links

Biography[edit]
Early life[edit]
Tony Peakewas born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1951 to English parents. His father, Bladon Peake (1902–1972), was a theatre and film director. Peake was educated at Waterkloof House Preparatory School in Pretoria, St. Martin’s School in Johannesburg and at Rhodes University in Grahamstown, where he read History and English, graduating with a BA (Hons) in English.
Career[edit]
Peake moved to London in 1973. He worked as production manager at the Open Space Theatre under Charles Marowitz and Thelma Holt. In the late seventies he lived for a while on Ibiza and taught English, History and Drama at the Morna Valley School. Since then he has lived in London and Mistley and worked in modelling, acting, film distribution and latterly as a literary agent.
As a short story writer and essayist, Peake has contributed to four volumes of Winter’s Tales (edited by Robin Baird-Smith, Constable), The Penguin Book of Contemporary South African Short Stories (edited by Stephen Gray), The Mammoth Book of Gay Short Stories (edited by Peter Burton, Robinson Publishing), New Writing 13 (edited by Toby Litt and Ali Smith, Picador), The Way We Are Now: gay and lesbian lives in the 21st century (a Stonewall (UK) anthology edited by Ben Summerskill, Continuum), Seduction (Serpent’s Tail), a themed anthology which he also edited, and Yes, I Am! Writing by South African Gay Men (compiled by Robin Malan & Ashraf Johaardien, Junkets Publisher, Cape Town).
Peake is also the author of two novels, A Summer Tide (Abacus, 1993) and Son to the Father (Little, Brown 1995; Abacus 1996), and the authorised biography of Derek Jarman (Little, Brown 1999; Abacus 2000; Overlook Press 2000; reissued in the States by the University of Minnesota Press 2011).
Works[edit]
Non Fiction[edit]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (December 2011)

Short stories[edit]

‘Necessary Appendages’, in Winter’s Tales 7, edited by Robin Baird-Smith, Constable, London, 1991, ISBN 0-09-470810-X
‘Girl Dancing’, in Winter’s Tales 8, edited by Robin Baird-Smith, Constable, London, 1992, ISBN 0-09-471600-5
‘Necessary Appendages’, in The Penguin Book of Contemporary South African Short Stories, edited by Steven Gray, Penguin, London, 1993, ISBN 0-14-023726-7
‘A Son’s Sto
BJ야동

Haydn Lewis

Haydn Lewis

Country (sports)
 Barbados

Born
(1986-01-02) 2 January 1986 (age 31)

Plays
Left-handed

Prize money
US$26,134

Singles

Career record
0–0

Career titles
0

Highest ranking
No. 583 (October 27, 2008)

Doubles

Career record
0–0

Career titles
0

Highest ranking
No. 405 (August 15, 2011)

Haydn Lewis (born January 2, 1986) is a professional Barbadian tennis player.
Lewis reached his highest individual ranking on the ATP Tour on October 27, 2008, when he became World number 583. He primarily plays on the Futures circuit and the Challenger circuit.
Lewis is a member of the Barbadian Davis Cup team, having posted a 24–7 record in singles and a 14–9 record in doubles in thirty-six ties played.
Tour singles finals – all levels (0–3)[edit]

Legend (Singles)

Grand Slam (0–0)

Tennis Masters Cup (0–0)

ATP Masters Series (0–0)

ATP Tour (0–0)

Challengers (0–0)

Futures (0–3)

Outcome
No.
Date
Tournament
Surface
Opponent in the final
Score

Runner-up
1.
October 29, 2007
Happy Valley, Australia
Hard
Andrew Coelho
4–6, 1–6

Runner-up
2.
March 17, 2008
Sorrento, Australia
Hard
Colin Ebelthite
6–3, 3–6, 2–6

Runner-up
3.
May 11, 2009
Tampa, U.S.
Clay
Philip Bester
2–6, 6–7(7–9)

External links[edit]

ATP Profile
ITF Profile
Davis Cup Profile

강남오피

National Register of Historic Places listings in Closter, New Jersey

Map of Bergen County, New Jersey, highlighting Closter

Map all coordinates using OSM
Map all coordinates using Google
Map up to 200 coordinates using Bing

Export all coordinates as KML

Export all coordinates as GeoRSS

Export all coordinates as GPX

Map all microformatted coordinates

Place data as RDF

Contents: Counties in New Jersey  

Atlantic – Bergen – Burlington – Camden – Cape May – Cumberland – Essex – Gloucester – Hudson – Hunterdon – Mercer – Middlesex – Monmouth – Morris – Ocean – Passaic – Salem – Somerset – Sussex – Union – Warren

The table below includes 10 sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the Borough of Closter, New Jersey in Bergen County. Latitude and longitude coordinates of the sites listed on this page may be displayed in a map or exported in several formats by clicking on one of the links in the box below the map to the right.[1]
National Register listings elsewhere in Bergen County may be found in separate articles.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted February 10, 2017.[2]

Current listings[edit]

[3]
Name on the Register[4]
Image
Date listed[5]
Location
Description

1
William De Clark House

000000001983-01-09-0000January 9, 1983
(#83001488)

145 Piermont Rd.
40°58′41″N 73°56′40″W / 40.978056°N 73.944444°W / 40.978056; -73.944444 (William De Clark House)

2
Abram Demaree House

000000001979-11-01-0000November 1, 1979
(#79001471)

Schraalenburgh and Old Hooks Rds.
40°58′35″N 73°58′53″W / 40.976389°N 73.981389°W / 40.976389; -73.981389 (Abram Demaree House)

3
Haring-Auryanson House

000000001983-08-15-0000August 15, 1983
(#83001516)

377 Piermont Rd.
40°58′17″N 73°56′53″W / 40.971389°N 73.948056°W / 40.971389; -73.948056 (Haring-Auryanson House)

4
Harold Hess Lustron House

000000002000-07-25-0000July 25, 2000
(#00000796)

421 Durie Ave.
40°58′15″N 73°58′02″W / 40.970833°N 73.967222°W / 40.970833; -73.967222 (Harold Hess Lustron House)

5
John Nagle House

000000001983-01-09-0000January 9, 1983
(#83001534)

75 Harvard St.
40°58′46″N 73°56′27″W / 40.979444°N 73.940833°W / 40.979444; -73.940833 (John Nagle House)

6
Henry Naugle House

000000001983-01-09-0000January 9, 1983
(#83001535)

119 Hickory Lane
40°58′24″N 73°56′26″W / 40.973333°N 73.940556°W / 40.97

Treur River

The Treur River at its confluence with the Blyde at Bourke’s Luck Potholes

The Treur River (from Afrikaans: mourning river) is a small river in the Drakensberg escarpment region of eastern Mpumalanga province, South Africa. The R532 motor route intersects it twice. Its ultimate origin is inside the Blyde River Canyon Nature Reserve, though most of its course is to the west of this protected area. It is a tributary of the Blyde River, and has no major tributaries of its own. There are two sharp drops in its course, at Poe Falls 24°45′S 30°52′E / 24.750°S 30.867°E / -24.750; 30.867 and Bourke’s Luck Potholes respectively.
Etymology[edit]
Treur means “mourning”[1] in Dutch, and was thus named during a voortrekker expedition. In 1844, while still under the misapprehension that Hendrik Potgieter and his party had perished on their journey to Delagoa Bay, their distraught relatives named the river near their encampment, Treurrivier, or ‘mourning river’.
See also[edit]

Treur River Barb

References[edit]

^ “Dictionary of Southern African Place Names” by RE Raper – HSRC

Coordinates: 24°48′17″S 30°52′54″E / 24.80472°S 30.88167°E / -24.80472; 30.88167

Dewayne Bunch (Kentucky)

For other people named Dewayne Bunch, see Dewayne Bunch (disambiguation).
DeWayne Bunch (February 22, 1962 – July 11, 2012) was a teacher and a Republican politician in Kentucky.[1]
Biography[edit]
Bunch taught mathematics and science at Whitley County High School in Williamsburg, Kentucky. He also was a member of the Kentucky National Guard for 23 years and served a tour of duty in Iraq. In 2010 he was elected to the Kentucky House of Representatives, defeating incumbent Charlie Siler to represent the 82nd district (Whitley County and part of Laurel County).[2][3]
Bunch resigned his seat in the Kentucky House on October 26, 2011, following his head injury, and Kentucky Governor Steven Beshear called for a special election to be held December 20, 2011, to fill the rest of Bunch’s term, which was to end December 31, 2012. DeWayne Bunch’s wife Regina, a special education teacher at Whitley County Middle School, announced that she would seek to succeed him in office, running as a Republican. Local party leaders named Regina Bunch as their candidate. As of November 16, 2011, Democratic Party leaders in Whitley County said they were unlikely to nominate a candidate to oppose her.[3][4][5]
Head injury and death[edit]
On April 12, 2011, while attempting to break up a fight in the school cafeteria, Bunch was knocked down and hit his head on the floor, which the local sheriff described as being hard “like slate”.[2] In the immediate aftermath of the incident he was reported to be in “extremely critical condition”,[2] after being rushed to the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington, where he was treated for more than two weeks, before being transferred to the Shepherd Center, a specialized facility in Atlanta for the treatment and rehabilitation of brain and spinal cord injuries.[6] By June, he was communicating with his family, and had regained certain abilities, but as of October 2011, he was still a patient at the Shepherd Center.[7]
Bunch died on July 11, 2012 from the injuries sustained the year before, aged 50.[8]
References[edit]

^ Bunch, Dewayne, Our Campaigns Web site, accessed October 16, 2011
^ a b c Rep. Bunch critically injured in fight at Kentucky high school, WATE.com, April 12, 2011
^ a b Mark White, Following resignation, wife of former State Rep. to seek her husband’s seat, The News Journal (Corbin, Kentucky), October 27, 2011, accessed December 12, 2011
^ Jack Brammer, Wife of injured former lawmaker named GOP nominee in speci

1989–90 Yugoslav Ice Hockey League season

The 1989–90 Yugoslav Ice Hockey League season was the 48th season of the Yugoslav Ice Hockey League, the top level of ice hockey in Yugoslavia. Six teams participated in the league, and Medveščak have won the championship.
Final ranking[edit]

Medveščak
Jesenice
Olimpija
Partizan
Red Star
Vojvodina Novi Sad

External links[edit]

Season on eurohockey.com
Yugoslav Ice Hockey League seasons

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